River up from last year, officials say

Water levels were rising and clouds hung overhead on the lower St. Joe early this week. Rain is forecast to last until at least Saturday, when the river is expected to have risen to nearly three feet higher than this time last year.

The St. Joe River may see some mild flooding over Memorial Day weekend according to the National Weather Service.

Meteorologist Robin Fox said that those expecting to camp this weekend may see higher water levels on the St. Joe River compared to last year.

The river is expected to be almost three feet higher than recorded last year. Ms. Fox said that this is due to significant snow pack and rain.

“We are going into a weather pattern as we approach the end of the week,” Ms. Fox said. “Most of central and northern Idaho can expect to see rain showers through Friday.”

“You can expect to see a lot of water run off from the mountains and the rivers will be going up by the end of the week,” Ms. Fox said.

According to the National Weather Service, rivers and creeks in the area are expected to reach bank full or minor flood stage by the weekend.

“We are going to see rivers reach bank full late this week, and looks especially true for the St. Maries and Calder areas,” Ms. Fox said. “It could be possibly higher than that.”

Residents can expect chances of rain showers through Saturday with a small chance of thunderstorms.

For more information on area water levels, contact the National Weather Service's Spokane office at 509-244-6395.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.